How To Make Tomato Vegetable Juice

Of all the things you can do to preserve fresh, summer tomatoes, Homemade Tomato Vegetable Juice is one of my favorites. It’s so easy to do and you can adjust the flavor of the juice in so many ways, by using a combination of different vegetables that you like.

I like to include a good variety and love the flavor that the tomato juice gets from the onion, garlic, celery and carrots. Of course, you can keep it very simple by just cooking the tomatoes alone and having a very clean tomato flavor. I also like to step it up a notch and add beets, herbs (such as thyme, parsley, dill, etc.), bell peppers and even add some heat to the juice by adding some hot peppers.

A cold glass of smooth tomato juice, rich in flavor, is a taste of summer sunshine and warmth. If you love Tomato Juice, this homemade version will knock your socks off.

Ingredients:

10 lbs tomatoes

3-5 ribs of celery

2 carrots

1-2 onions

8 garlic cloves

1/2 – 1 Tablespoon black peppercorns

2 bay leaves

1 Tablespoon granulated sugar

1  Tablespoon salt

1/4 cup lemon juice

Instructions:

Cut the tomatoes in half or quarters. Cut the celery into 3-4 pieces, thinly slice the carrots, peel and quarter the onion, peel the garlic. Honestly, you don’t have to cut the tomatoes, but cutting them helps them cook a little bit faster.

Place all the ingredients EXCEPT the lemon juice in a large stockpot. Bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, and keep cooking, for about 30-45 minutes, until all the vegetables are soft.

If you are using beets and carrots, they take a little bit longer to cook through and get soft, so you will need to cook the juice a little bit longer. If you are just using tomatoes, onions, garlic and celery, 30 minutes should be enough time. Use a potato masher or a immersion blender to mash up all the vegetables. This will get you a lot more juice and it will be faster to strain. If you have a food mill, you can use that instead.

Pour in the lemon juice.

The lemon juice will help to make sure there is enough acidity to be at a safe ph level for canning. The lemon juice won’t change the flavor. Although almost all tomatoes will already be high enough in acidity for canning – it is a simple extra step to ensure safety.

Strain the tomato juice through a fine mesh sieve, pushing on the vegetable solids to extract as much juice as possible. Taste the tomato juice and add more salt and/or sugar if needed.

If you don’t sterilize the jars, the juice will keep for about 1 week in the refrigerator. You can also freeze tomato juice for up to 1 year.

Sterilize your canning jars and lids.

This is how I sterilize jars.

Wash the jars and lids in hot and soapy water. Then I place the glass jars in a 200 degrees Fahrenheit oven for about 15 minutes. Using your dishwasher works great too.

For the lids, I usually bring a pot of water to a boil, take it off the heat and let the lids stay in the boiling water for 10-15 minutes also.

Pour the strained juice into the sterilized jars, leaving about 1/2″ of space at the top. Wipe the rims of the jars so that they seal properly and top with the lids.

Out of this amount of tomatoes and vegetables, I was able to get 4 quarts plus a little bit extra. The amount will be slightly different, depending on how juicy the tomatoes are that you are using.

Place sealed jars in boiling water bath for about 10 minutes. (Make sure you place a towel at the bottom of the pot, so that the jars are not directly touching the pot. Remove from the water and cool completely.

Store opened jars of juice in the refrigerator. 

Tomato Vegetable Juice
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Miscellaneous
Serves: 4 quarts
Ingredients
  • 10 lbs tomatoes
  • 3-5 ribs of celery
  • 2 carrots
  • 1-2 onions
  • 8 garlic cloves
  • ½ - 1 Tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 Tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon salt
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Cut the tomatoes in half or quarters. Cut the celery into 3-4 pieces, thinly slice the carrots, peel and quarter the onion, peel the garlic. Honestly, you don't have to cut the tomatoes, but cutting them helps them cook a little bit faster.
  2. Place all the ingredients EXCEPT the lemon juice in a large stockpot. Bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, and keep cooking, for about 30-45 minutes, until all the vegetables are soft.
  3. If you are using beets and carrots, they take a little bit longer to cook through and get soft, so you will need to cook the juice a little bit longer. If you are just using tomatoes, onions, garlic and celery, 30 minutes should be enough time.
  4. Use a potato masher or a immersion blender to mash up all the vegetables. This will get you a lot more juice and it will be faster to strain. If you have a food mill, you can use that instead. Pour in the lemon juice.
  5. The lemon juice will help to make sure there is enough acidity to be at a safe ph level for canning. The lemon juice won't change the flavor. Although almost all tomatoes will already be high enough in acidity for canning – it is a simple extra step to ensure safety.
  6. Strain the tomato juice through a fine mesh sieve, pushing on the vegetable solids to extract as much juice as possible. Taste the tomato juice and add more salt and/or sugar if needed.
  7. If you don't sterilize the jars, the juice will keep for about 1 week in the refrigerator. You can also freeze tomato juice for up to 1 year.
  8. Sterilize your canning jars and lids.
  9. This is how I sterilize jars.
  10. Wash the jars and lids in hot and soapy water. Then I place the glass jars in a 200 degrees Fahrenheit oven for about 15 minutes. Using your dishwasher works great too.
  11. For the lids, I usually bring a pot of water to a boil, take it off the heat and let the lids stay in the boiling water for 10-15 minutes also.
  12. Pour the strained juice into the sterilized jarsleaving about ½" of space at the top. Wipe the rims of the jars so that they seal properly and top with the lids.
  13. Out of this amount of tomatoes and vegetables, I was able to get 4 quarts plus a little bit extra. The amount will be slightly different, depending on how juicy the tomatoes are that you are using.
  14. Place sealed jars in boiling water bath for about 10 minutes. (Make sure you place a towel at the bottom of the pot, so that the jars are not directly touching the pot. Remove from the water and cool completely.
  15. Store open jars of juice in the refrigerator.

6 Comments

  • Victoriya

    Thank you so much for the recipe. I have been waiting for it since we have lots of tomatoes and I want to make as much use of it as possible. Plus fresh tomatoe juice in winter sounds just amazing. Quick question so if I follow all the steps can the tomatoe juice be stable on the shelf till winter? Or only if frozen?…

  • Katy | Her Cup of Joy

    I used to make tomato juice all the time when I had a garden! I can’t wait to start my garden back up again once we finish building our house. I love how you combined this tomato juice with other veggies for more of a vegetable stock flavor. I will definitely bookmark this recipe for the future.

  • Lora

    Thank you for the tomato juice recipe. I’ve always liked to drink well chilled tomato juice. Do you think there is a way doing it in the Instant Pot to make the process go a little faster?

    P.S. I sterilize my jars and lids exactly the same way. Most jars kept canned goods stored in garage up to 4-5 years and still were good.

    • olgak7

      Hi Lora. You’re welcome for the recipe; I like to drink my tomato juice really cold too:).
      You probably can make it in the Instant Pot, however, you will get a very small amount of juice if you make it there, so I prefer to use the stovetop method because I like making a huge batch at once.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.