Russian Cheese Stuffed Flatbread

Russian Cheese Stuffed Flatbread 3

I need to learn my Russian food history better. The fact of the matter is, I don’t know exactly where this Cheesy Stuffed Flatbread originates. I’ve heard it called Khachapuri, made in Georgia. My husband also ate something very similar in Osetia, which they called Pirogi. 

On one of the mission trips to Russia, Osetia, 2008, to be exact, my husband got to try this specialty. It was usually served with a whole cluster of herbs on the side, along with the main meal, quite often lamb. I’m pretty sure they prepared it very differently, even possibly with other ingredients. I didn’t have this food blog at the time, so he didn’t get the recipe for me:). When I spotted the recipe online, I was really intrigued and had to give it a try.

It reminds me of a stuffed pizza, except the dough is tender and soft, sort of like shortbread with such a creamy, cheesy and scrumptious filling.

I thought I would include a few pictures of that mission trip that Sergi went on, Northern Osetia, 2008. Enjoy.OsetiaDima Ulya 241

OsetiaDima Ulya 243

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1 076Recipe from Videoculinary.com. 

Ingredients:

Flatbread:

1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon sugar

8 oz farmer’s cheese (1 1/2 – 1 3/4 cups)

1 stick (8 Tablespoons) butter, softened

1 egg

Cheese Filling:

6 oz cheese (Monterey Jack, mozzarella, provolone, cheddar, etc.), finely grated

1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, finely grated

1 egg

1 Tablespoon sour cream

1 garlic clove, minced

Egg Wash:

1 egg

1 Tablespoon water

Optional Garnish:

Parmesan cheese, finely grated

Fresh parsley, chopped

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

Cheese Filling:

Start by making the Cheese Filling, so it’ll be ready to go as  soon as you make the bread dough.

Combine the finely grated cheeses, egg, sour cream and minced garlic clove and mix. Set aside.

IMG_8865-2

IMG_8866-2Bread Dough:

Farmer’s cheese is usually very stiff and dense, so I usually like to pulse it a few times in the food processor, so it will be easier to mix thoroughly in the dough.

IMG_8868-2In a large bowl, combine the flour, farmer’s cheese, softened butter and egg. (I forgot to take a picture of the egg in the dough:(. Oops.)  IMG_8876-2Mix it gently, until a soft dough forms. IMG_8879-2Assembling the Bread:

Divide the dough into two pieces, one slightly larger than the other.

IMG_8880-2On  a lightly floured surface, roll out the smaller piece of dough into an approximately 11 inch circle. Place in on top of the prepared baking sheet. IMG_8882-2Spread the cheese filling over the dough, leaving a small border. IMG_8885-2Roll out the second part of dough on a lightly floured surface as well, this time into an approximately 12 -13 inch circle. Place it over the filling and tuck the edges of the top under the bottom piece of dough. IMG_8894-2

IMG_8896-2Brush with an egg wash and poke the top of the bread with a fork all over the surface.

IMG_8902-2Bake in the preheated oven for 20-30 minutes. Serve the bread with a garnish of fresh minced parsley and more finely grated Parmesan cheese.

Russian Cheese Stuffed Flatbread sm1

Russian Cheese Stuffed Flatbread 3

Russian Cheese Stuffed Flatbread
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Miscellaneous
Serves: 4
Ingredients
Flatbread:
  • 1¾ cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 8 oz farmer's cheese (1½ - 1¾ cups)
  • 1 stick (8 Tablespoons) butter, softened
  • 1 egg
Cheese Filling:
  • 6 oz cheese (Monterey Jack, mozzarella, provolone, cheddar, etc.), finely grated
  • ¼ cup Parmesan cheese, finely grated
  • 1 egg
  • 1 Tablespoon sour cream
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
Egg Wash:
  • 1 egg
  • 1 Tablespoon water
Optional Garnish:
  • Parmesan cheese, finely grated
  • Fresh parsley, chopped
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.
Cheese Filling:
  1. Start by making the Cheese Filling, so it'll be ready to go as soon as you make the bread dough.
  2. Combine the finely grated cheeses, egg, sour cream and minced garlic clove and mix. Set aside.
Bread Dough:
  1. Farmer's cheese is usually very stiff and dense, so I usually like to pulse it a few times in the food processor, so it will be easier to mix thoroughly in the dough.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the flour, farmer's cheese, softened butter and egg. Mix it gently, until a soft dough forms.
Assembling the Bread:
  1. Divide the dough into two pieces, one slightly larger than the other.
  2. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the smaller piece of dough into an approximately 11 inch circle.
  3. Spread the cheese filling over the dough, leaving a small border.
  4. Roll out the second part of dough on a lightly floured surface as well, this time into an approximately 12 -13 inch circle. Place it over the filling and tuck the edges of the top under the bottom piece of dough.
  5. Brush with an egg wash and poke the top of the bread with a fork all over the surface.
  6. Bake in the preheated oven for 20-30 minutes.
  7. Serve the bread with a garnish of fresh minced parsley and more finely grated Parmesan cheese.

36 Comments

  • Valentin Goncharenko

    This cheese bread is incredible!!! The sharpness of the Parmesan cheese is offset by the savory taste of the dough. Definitely a win anytime! Fantastic implementation of the recipe Olga!! Wonderful work!! Love it!!!

  • natalya wilson

    Olga..question. …where do you buy Farmers cheese besides russian (international) store? I been looking at our grocery stores and can’t find…:( this dishs looks and sound sooo delishious! Want to try it!! Its just russian store its kind of far away from me… can I use different cheese like ricorra or cottage cheese insread?

    • olgak7

      I actually buy it in Publix, a local grocery store. If you can’t find it, you can use cottage cheese, just squeeze out all the liquid, because it’s much more wet than farmer’s cheese.

      • demelzabunny

        I can often find farmer cheese (the brand is Friendship) in some local supermarkets, so you should look around. Also, if you have access to a Polish deli, they’ll stock it, too.

    • Chantel

      If it’s actually tvorog then make it at home. You can either heat buttermilk from a carton until it separates then pour into a cheesecloth or thin kitchen towel lined colander to catch the curds. Squeeze out some liquid, tie a knot in the cloth so the curds don’t fall out and hang over your sink for 30 min to an hour. Ta da tvorog!

  • demelzabunny

    I believe this is khachapuri, originally from Georgia, but it’s popular all over Russia. In Russian, we would call this “pirog,” because anything that’s a stuffed bread-type item is a pirog, as I’m sure you know!

    • Natacha

      Hi, it is actually originated from Georgia and is indeed called хачапури.
      My mother-in-law who is from Tbilissi teached me how to make this bread And it is absolutely yummy

      I also must say I love your site and recepies

      Greetings from Belgium

  • Julia @Vikalinka

    They look incredible,Olga! I’ve had them in Georgia when I was a little girl. I find it so difficult to know the origin of many things we eat and consider our own. When I first met my husband he was very excited to get me to try “pierogi” which he claimed to be a Canadian specialty! lol Anyway, I told him where they came from. 🙂 I just posted a family recipe of Sharlotka and was told by a Polish girl it wasn’t spelled right and it’s not Russian but rather Polish. Go figure 🙂

  • Olya D

    I thought kachapura was more like a cheese boat? So it’s not topped with dough, just melted cheese. That’s how I remember my aunt describing it from Georgia…

    • olgak7

      Like I said in the introduction, I’m not sure exactly where it originates, although I’ve seen similar versions online that look just like this. My husband tried the Osetinsie Pirogi, and he said they looked and tasted like this. Oh, well. The most important thing is that it’s delicious and simple to prepare:).

  • Julia

    Made this today and it was delicious! Out of my 3 kids, my almost 2-year-old loved it most; he kept calling it “pizza” and shoving pieces in his mouth 😀 I used my Kitchen Aid and the hook attachment on the lowest speed to mix the dough & it worked out great. Thank you!

    • olgak7

      I’m so happy to hear that, Julia! It’s so sweet when little ones enjoy our food, right? I remember making my niece an omelet and she just gobbled it right up and it melted my heart:).

  • diana

    There are many different types of khachapuri. My husband is from Tbilisi Georgia and they make these kind in Imereti region. It depends which region you come from ..if you come from adjara they make em boat sizes and different cheese. And in Georgia most men know how to make them..so im spoiled 🙂

  • Lana

    What a great recipe:) this flat cheese bread is absolutely amazing Olga! Makes a very great appetizer. Quick question, 8 oz of farmers cheese equal 1 cup, but in your recipe you stated 8 oz = 1 1/2 to 1 3/4?

  • Natalie

    Hi, Olga!
    I made this today for a ‘girls’ brunch’ and everybody loved it!
    Will for sure make it again as I like dough recipes where no mixer is needed. I also prepared it ahead of time, froze it and baked it at my friend’s house. Fresh out of the oven, this cheese stuffed bread tastes amazing! Thank you!

  • nada

    Hey…..i am an indian and living in uzbekistan(new home maker)…. i like to try uzbek russian recipes….and ur blog is my fav… tried this recipe tday and it was reallyyy yummyyyy…..my hubby loved it so much :)….. i tried many of ur recipes and all the time it used to be big hit….yest made uzbek plov…recipe taken frm here….and i cant express my happiness that it was yummyy than restaurant one….thanks alot for ur step by step instructions and keep going…. w8ing for the new recipes to experiment….

  • ludmila

    Hi olechka,
    I have a question regarding cheese feelings. You listed 4 different cheeses 6 oz, but should I use all 4 cheeses or just one of them. Please let me know.
    Thank you in advance !

  • dv8

    made it for lunch today with a few changes.
    dough: i used about 50 grams of butter but i think it could easily go without, not traditional, perhaps but a calorie saver nonetheless. replaced some of the flour with wholewheat.
    filling: i used few slices of provolone and gouda cheese plus whatever what left from farmer’s cheese. added lots of garlic and parsley and used food processor to mix.
    the result was delicious. i will definitely make again and tweak further. it’s a great base recipe to experiment with, really appreciate you posting it. thanks.

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