Multigrain Bread

Multigrain bread (500x334) Homemade bread can seem like an intimidating task, but it really is a simple homemaking skill. If you have a standing mixer, there’s hardly any work involved at all. It’s so rewarding to take out a warm and fragrant loaf of bread from the oven, and the smell that wafts throughout the house is amazing. I wish I could have my house smell like that all the time.

I have my standard recipes for regular white bread, and I love them, but I also wanted to find a good recipe for a whole wheat, multigrain bread as well. The problem with most whole wheat recipes is that the bread is so dense and hard, and that’s not what I was going for. I also didn’t want to be perusing many aisles in several specialty stores looking for all the different grains that the recipe would need. As soon as I gave this recipe from American’s Test Kitchen a try, my husband and I were both very pleased with the results and I’ve been making it for several years now. It’s superb with a warm and cozy bowl of soup, as a sandwich or a simple snack. (I’ll have you know, that toast with a cup of tea is my ultimate snack of choice.)

Ingredients:

1 1/4 cups 5 or 7-grain hot cereal mix

2 1/2 cups boiling water

3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, plus extra for dusting work surface

1 1/2 cups whole-wheat flour

4 Tablespoons honey

4 Tablespoons butter, melted and cooled slightly

2 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast

1 Tablespoon table salt

1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats or quick oats

This multigrain hot cereal mix is the perfect answer to multigrain bread. You can use this 5 grain mix that I found at a regular local grocery store, or look for 7-grain mix by Bob’s Red Mill or Arrowhead Mills.

Instead of gathering many different grains and dealing with them all separately, the hot mix cereal gives us a simple solution. Here we have numerous grains and we only have to deal with them once. Isn’t it genius?

IMG_8123 (334x500) Pour the boiling water over the cereal mix and set aside for about an hour, until it cools to approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit. During that time, the cereal will hydrate and soften, soaking in all that water. IMG_8128 (500x334)

IMG_8131 (500x334) In another large bowl, combine the two flours together. Using half the amount of whole wheat as all purpose flour, will keep the bread nice and soft. IMG_8130 (500x334) Once the cereal has cooled,  add the honey, melted butter and yeast. Mix to combine. IMG_8133 (500x334)

IMG_8134 (500x334) In a standing mixer with a dough hook attachment, mix the dough on low speed, slowly adding in the mixed flours. IMG_8137 (500x334) Mix for about 2 minutes, until the dough forms a ball. IMG_8140 (500x334) Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set it aside to rest for 20 minutes.

Resting bread dough for 20 minutes is a very important step. As the bread rests, the flour protein begins to break down and becomes much easier to mix. We have not added salt yet, and it’s also important to note that leaving the salt out until after the short rest period will make gluten development quicker. Unsalted bread dough that rests for just a short amount of time will be pliant and smooth, while salted bread dough that doesn’t get a 20  minute resting period will still be gluey and stiff.

Add the salt and mix knead the bread dough for about 7 minutes, until the dough has pulled away from the sides of the bowl. If you’ve mixed if for 3-5 minutes and it’s still sticking to the bowl, add 3 Tablespoons more flour. IMG_8144 (500x334)

IMG_8145 (500x334) Coat the dough lightly in oil, cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a towel and set aside to rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 40 minutes. IMG_8147 (500x334)

IMG_8148 (500x334) Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease 2 bread pans with oil.

When the dough has doubled in size, cut the dough in half. Flatten each half of dough into a rectangle and then tightly roll the rectangle into a loaf. Why? This will help the bread have an even texture, help it rise better and result in a nicer looking loaf of bread. IMG_8152 (500x334)

IMG_8153 (500x334) Lightly spritz each loaf with water or oil and roll in the oats, just enough for the oats to adhere to the bread. IMG_8157 (500x334) Place into the loaf pans and set aside to rise until double in size, for another 40 minutes or so. (If your kitchen isn’t warm, it will take longer.) IMG_8160 (500x331)

IMG_8165 (500x329) Bake for 35-40 minutes in the preheated oven. Cool the bread in the loaf pans for about 5 minutes before taking them out of the loaf pans and onto a cooling rack.

If you have a small family, you can freeze the second loaf. Wrap it securely and freeze and then simply thaw and serve when you need more bread. It will stay fresh perfectly. Another option is to share the second loaf with your friends or someone in need. I’m sure your thoughtfulness will be appreciated. Who wouldn’t love a fresh loaf of homemade bread?

Multigrain bread (500x334)

Multigrain Bread 2 (500x334)

Slices of Multigrain Bread (500x334)

Multigrain Bread
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Miscellaneous
Serves: 2 loaves of bread
Ingredients
  • 1¼ cups 7-grain hot cereal mix
  • 2½ cups boiling water
  • 3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, plus extra for dusting work surface
  • 1½ cups whole-wheat flour
  • 4 Tablespoons honey
  • 4 Tablespoons butter, melted and cooled slightly
  • 2½ teaspoons instant yeast
  • 1 Tablespoon table salt
  • ½ cup old-fashioned rolled oats or quick oats
Instructions
  1. Pour the boiling water over the cereal mix and set aside for about an hour, until it cools to approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit. During that time, the cereal will hydrate and soften, soaking in all that water.
  2. In another large bowl, combine the two flours together.
  3. Once the cereal has cooled, add the honey, melted butter and yeast. Mix to combine.
  4. In a standing mixer with a dough hook attachment, mix the dough on low speed, slowly adding in the mixed flours. Mix for about 2 minutes, until the dough forms a ball.
  5. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set it aside to rest for 20 minutes.
  6. Add the salt and mix knead the bread dough for about 7 minutes, until the dough has pulled away from the sides of the bowl. If you've mixed if for 3-5 minutes and it's still sticking to the bowl, add 3 Tablespoons more flour.
  7. Coat the dough lightly in oil, cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a towel and set aside to rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 40 minutes.
  8. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease 2 bread pans with oil.
  9. When the dough has doubled in size, cut the dough in half. Flatten each half of dough into a rectangle and then tightly roll the rectangle into a loaf.
  10. Lightly spritz each loaf with water or oil and roll in the oats, just enough for the oats to adhere to the bread. Place into the loaf pans and set aside to rise until double in size, for another 40 minutes or so.
  11. Bake for 35-40 minutes in the preheated oven.
  12. Cool the bread in the loaf pans for about 5 minutes before taking them out of the loaf pans and onto a cooling rack.

 

 

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Comments

  1. Oksana says

    Will be making this next week after I buy the multi grain hot cereal. THANK YOU once again for another great recipe.

  2. Alena H. says

    Oh thank you!!! Just yesterday I was thinking that I need to find a good recipe for healthy bread instead of only baking white bread for my family, and here it is. I will be trying this and letting you know. We wives and moms have a great responsibility for what our family eats!!!!!! I’m on a mission to improve family’s immune system:)

  3. Paramitha Nasimova says

    Hi Olga,

    Just wondering how’s the bread texture? Is it soft? :) I really love your step by step photos by the way! So helpful!

  4. Julia says

    Thank you for such great recipe! I have been living in the kitchen since discovering your blog. You are very talented young lady!

  5. Yelena says

    Thank you, Olga, for sharing this recipe. I just bake couple of loafs tonight and really like it. May God bless you and your wonderful family!!!

  6. Alena H. says

    Olga, I made this twice already. I follow your recipe, but the dough is extremely sticky and won’t rise much for me after I put it in the loaf pans. Your bread looks higher than how mine came out. Any suggestions?

    • says

      Hi Alena! You can add a few Tablespoons of flour to the bread dough if it’s still sticking to the sides of the bowl. Also, did you let it rise long enough? Was your room warm enough?

  7. Farzana says

    This is such a nicely written recipe with pictures that are so clear in every step. I just printed it out and I am soooo gonna make this soon! Will let you know how it turned out ! Thanks for sharing your recipe. Ya know something, I never even thought about using cereal like this! Smart idea . . . all in one instead of going out to buy individual seeds :-) THANKS

  8. Yana P says

    Would I be able to substitute old fashioned oats? Would you also be able to post a good 100% whole grain bread recipe?

    Blessings,
    Yana

  9. Ricky says

    I finally have a kitchen large enough for me to bake. My loafs are now in the final 40 minutes of rising within the loaf pan. I am experimenting by leaving one loaf on a pizza stone. If it does not work out, I hope i have success with the one in the loaf pan. I could not find any 5 or 7 grain cereals, only oats. I mixed in some wheat bran, wheat germ and rolled oats. The rest of the recipe is as you shared. In approximately 2 hrs I will be able to tell you how it turned out.
    Thank you Olga

  10. says

    Thanks for the great recipe and instructions, Olga! I baked my first loaf of bread ever last night! I think I have room to improve, but the bread still tastes great, so it was a good beginner’s experience :)

  11. Betsy says

    I LOVE this recipe! Made it today and it is such a nice consistency but the rolled oats fell off as I sliced the bread. I sprayed it with olive oil and then rolled it in the oats…any advice?

  12. Kristen says

    I ran across your blog the other day and thought this recipe looked great! I have since tried to make it twice, both times my bread simply would not rise for me after I formed the loaf. I have made wheat bread for years and have not had this problem. During both of the rises I rest the bowl/loaf pans in warm water to aid in the raising process. For this recipe I did the same thing, to no avail. I waited for two hours for the last rise until I grew to frustrated and finally threw it into the oven. Ended up with flat, fairly dense loaves. I followed the recipe exactly with the one addition that I used a 10 grain hot cereal instead of a 5-7 grain.
    Do you have any thoughts on what could have gone wrong?

    • says

      I’m sorry, Kristen, but I just don’t know what to tell you. I tried to be very clear and precise in the recipe instructions. Is your yeast fresh? Try putting some in warm water and let it stand for 5 minutes, it should become foamy.
      Maybe your kitchen isn’t warm enough?

      • Kristen says

        The yeast is fresh, I just used it the other day. And I put the dough bowl in a sink filled with hot water for the sole purpose of ensuring that it is warm enough for the yeast to grow. I have read that using vital wheat gluten can help with rising issues. Do you think that may be my problem?

  13. Rachael says

    I made this recipe today. It turned out amazing! I bought a small bag of unbleached all-purpose flour at the store today thinking I had whole-wheat at home. Annnd I ended up with two bags of unbleached all-purpose. And I couldn’t find the 5 or 7-grain hot cereal at the commissary. So I made the following substitutions: Hodgson Mill Oat Bran hot cereal with some oats mixed in, and I used almond flour instead of the whole-wheat plus some ground flax seed. I can’t stop eating it!

  14. MM Saw says

    Hi, Olga. I just made the bread following your very clear directions and step-by-step photos…and the two loaves turned out great. I didn’t have wholewheat flour, so I substituted with plain bread flour. As for the multi-grain cereal, I happened to have leftover 5-grain porridge mix and that worked perfectly. It’s a brilliant idea to use cereal mixes like this.
    I just found your blog today and plan to return to enjoy your recipes and postings. Keep up the good work.
    Cheers!

    PS I have never bothered to leave comments in blogs I have visited todate. But I am so happy with your recipe and presentation, I just had to leave my thanks.

    • says

      Hi MM Saw! Welcome. I am so glad you stopped by and are happy with how the bread turned out:). Thanks for taking the time to write. It means a lot to me. I hope you find many other recipes that your family will enjoy.

  15. Nin says

    Thanks a lot for sharing this great recipe. That’s very nice to put all those details. I enjoyed your posts…

    I have a question for you. My breads have great texture but they are not even looking on the top! Here is what the problem is:

    I put the dough into the baking pans and let it rise again. After they got volume again, I put them into the preheated oven and right there in few minutes the top of the bread flattens down! I made even this bread with your recipe and the same thing happened on them. What do you think the problem might be?

    Maybe I need to add more flour? or less yeast?!

    Thank you

  16. Suzie says

    Thanks for the recipe.

    I made it this morning but made a few alterations.

    I used hot milk instead of water, a bit more honey, and split the amount of flour evenly between whole wheat and white.

    It turned out lovely. It had a nice texture and was soft.

  17. Jeanette Smith says

    Olgak7, I live in Australia and we use metric measurements. Can you give me some idea of weights please as our cups are 250 mils.? Thanks, look delicious and I love multi-grain bread.

  18. Jeanette Smith says

    Never mind Olga, made another 2 loaves today and they where flops as well. Four dead loaves of bread, I think this bread is not for me. Have been making bread for many years and have had an occasional flop, but never 4 in two days. Loaves look great, rise well, after 20 minutes in the oven down they come. When I cut them the centre is doughy. Have just discovered 7 grain hot cereal and thought it might be easier than adding individual grain but at least they turn out. Love your site and will try your chicken noodle soup next.

    • says

      I’m sorry to hear that this bread didn’t work out for you, Jeanette. I wouldn’t have been able to tell you metric measurements for the recipe, since I just use the standard American cup measurements.

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