Sushki

Sushki-1-25Sushki are a snack that you can find in any Russian store. They are small, ring shaped, dry and slightly sweet. They look like tiny little bagels. They are often sold tied on a string, like I have in the picture. They are perfect for nibbling on or to enjoy with some tea.

During this pregnancy, I have consumed bags of these little munchies. I have practically survived on toast, tea, soup and sushki. I even keep some sushki in a ziplock bag in my purse. The problem is that the Russian stores in our area are too far and inconveniently located. Whenever my husband would go there to get me a stash, he would stock up and get whatever was available. Sometimes they didn’t have any at all, and half the other times, they would taste stale. Boo. I remembered that my cousin, Natasha, had shared a recipe for homemade Sushki in the past, so I dug up the recipe and gave it a try. The  batter took me only 5 minutes to mix up. Even though shaping them into rings is a bit tedious, you’ll have a big supply once you’re done, so it’s worth it.

Typically, sushki are made with water, egg, flour and salt, but this recipe uses condensed milk, which gives them a sweeter, more cookie-like taste. My husband loved them! I would probably prefer the more bland version, which basically tastes like dry bread, but this one has more flavor.

This is a perfect snack to have on hand for kids. When I was visiting my parents for Christmas, they made sure to stock up on some Sushki for me. When my nieces saw me crunching away at them, of course they had to join in. From that moment on, they knew exactly where to find the “Sushechki” in the pantry and the bag was gone before we knew it. My Mom says that every time they come over, they always ask if Dedushka (Grandpa) bought some more “Sushechki”. Who knew that would become such big fans?   
Ingredients:

1 can (14 oz) condensed milk

2 eggs

4 Tablespoons softened butter

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon salt

4 cups flour

egg wash (1 egg and 1 Tablespoon milk)

Instructions:

Sushki-1-14Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, using a standing mixer with a paddle or whisk attachment or a hand mixer, mix the condensed milk, eggs, softened butter (the butter needs to be really soft, or it won’t incorporate into the batter) and vanilla.

Sushki-1-15

Sushki-1-16In another bowl, whisk the flour, baking soda and salt. Switch to the dough hook attachment. Add the flour gradually to the batter and mix until combined. If your eggs are on the smaller side, you might want to use only 3 3/4 cup. The batter will be very stiff, so if you don’t have a mixer with a good engine, you might want to mix the last batch of flour in by hand.

Sushki-1-17Portion out about 3/4 of a Tablespoon of dough and shape it into a ball. Roll the ball of dough into a rope and pinch the ends together. You can make them as thick or thin as you like.

Sushki-1-18

Sushki-1-19Place the shaped sushki onto the prepared baking sheet and brush them with the egg wash. You can also sprinkle them with poppy seeds. You can even add poppy seeds to the batter itself.

Sushki-1-20

Sushki-1-21I normally like poppy seeds, but ever since I’ve been pregnant, it puts me off. Don’t ask me why. My favorite bagel of all time is the sesame bagel, but I can’t even smell it now. Sigh. I can’t wait to get my normal stomach back.

Bake in the preheated oven for 15-20 minutes. Sushki-1-22The time will depend on how thick/thin you made the sushki, your oven and also how crunchy you prefer the sushki to be. I like mine on the crunchy side, so I made them thin and baked them longer too. If you make them a little bit thicker, they will be softer.

To save time, you can simply roll the dough into thin ropes and bake them into sticks. Much faster, same taste, but of course, they won’t have the “sushki” look.

Sushki-1-23Cool. Store in a ziptop bag or an airtight container.Sushki-1-24

Sushki
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Miscellaneous
Serves: 100 sushki
Ingredients
  • 1 can (14 oz) condensed milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 4 Tablespoons softened butter
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 4 cups flour
  • egg wash (1 egg and 1 Tablespoon milk)
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, using a standing mixer with a paddle or whisk attachment or a hand mixer, mix the condensed milk, eggs, softened butter (the butter needs to be really soft, or it won't incorporate into the batter) and vanilla.
  3. In another bowl, whisk the flour, baking soda and salt. Switch to the dough hook attachment. Add the flour gradually to the batter and mix until combined. If your eggs are on the smaller side, you might want to use only 3¾ cup. The batter will be very stiff, so if you don't have a mixer with a good engine, you might want to mix the last batch of flour in by hand.
  4. Portion out about ¾ of a Tablespoon of dough and shape it into a ball. Roll the ball of dough into a rope and pinch the ends together. You can make them as thick or thin as you like.
  5. Place the shaped sushki onto the prepared baking sheet and brush them with the egg wash. You can also sprinkle them with poppy seeds. You can even add poppy seeds to the batter itself.
  6. Bake in the preheated oven for 15-20 minutes.
  7. Cool. Store in a ziptop bag or an airtight container.
Notes
The baking time will depend on how thick/thin you made the sushki, your oven and also how crunchy you prefer the sushki to be. I like mine on the crunchy side, so I made them thin and baked them longer too. If you make them a little bit thicker, they will be softer.

To save time, you can simply roll the dough into thin ropes and bake them into sticks. Much faster, same taste, but of course, they won't have the "sushki" look.

24 Comments

  • Jessica

    What’s the Russian word for “condensed milk”? Is that the same as the small blue/white can sold in former Soviet countries?
    I’m going to pass this recipe along to my Dutch sister-in-law who is Ukrainian at heart!

  • Mom's Dish

    Omg Olga, you have outdone your self! I wonder if using a kitchen aid grinder attachment could help with the process. Making it go trough a thin sausage casing attachment. I have a very thin one.

    • olgak7

      You’re so sweet to say so:). This was more of fulfilling a craving, ha ha.
      It probably would work with the casing attachment, but shaping them into ropes didn’t take me very long, and you would still have to shape them into rings. Plus, extra dishes. I’m the type of person that tries to reduce the amount of dishes in any way possible. Half the time I don’t even take out the garlic press and would rather chop it by hand even though it’s so much easier with the garlic press, if I already have the chopping board and knife out.

  • Ekaterina

    I looked at your blog like I usually do daily and saw this recipe and my mouth literally dropped. Props to you for making this recipe and sharing it with us, Olga you are amazing!! I never knew that I could make this by hand. You are absolutely incredible!!! Thank you:) So excited to try them!

  • Milana

    Woah! How cool?! This is a really cool recipe to have on hand especially when you have kids! Were they a little too sweet for your liking olga?

    • olgak7

      Really great for kids!
      No, they weren’t too sweet. Actually, they are just slightly sweet, but I like the ones that aren’t sweet AT ALL, kind of like bread or bagels, etc.

  • Sofia

    Olga, I’ve been dreaming of these for months now, and haven’t found a recipe yet. Thank you, you’re wonderful! Although I was searching for the recipe as “bubliki”. Is that the same thing? Also if you could add the modification for the bland ones once you figure it out that would be awesome. One more thing, one day could you post an authentic black rye bread recipe? Thanks. Be well!

    • olgak7

      We always called them “Sushki” and that’s what they are labeled as at the grocery store packages. As far as I know, bubliki are larger and softer, more like smaller bagels.
      I will try to post a rye bread recipe. This is my favorite recipe for black bread – , although it isn’t authentic, it tastes just like it.

  • Alla

    Hi Olga!!!! Thank you so much for this recipe! I just made it yesterday and had to make it double portion because they come up so good! Forget the store bought ones now this ones are just incredible! soooooooo gooooooooooddddddd! My kids would not stop eating them! Thank you thank you so much for sharing it with us!!!!!!!! you are simple the best!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Anna

    Just made these turned out really good! What would you suggest to use instead of condensed milk if I were to make them unsweet?

  • Piper

    These are the best things I have ever eaten ever! Seriously, these are something great. The Russians really had it together when they made these.

    P.S. the dough will be really hard to mold into donut shapes. They will try to rip and slice open and create weird rope things, so to make sure you get a good snake for donut shaping, press down really hard when rolling.

  • ana levin

    I been looking for this recipe for so long……My mother in law was sephardic from Spain and she called them rosquitas, my boys loved them, nobody in the family had a recipe and we lost the delicious rosquitas that grandma used to make. Until my friend Lois served them at a tea that she hosted and here I am thanking my friend and you for letting me going back in time. Ana.

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